For climates with moderate heating and cooling needs, heat pumps offer an energy-efficient alternative to furnaces and air conditioners. Like your refrigerator, heat pumps use electricity to move heat from a cool space into a warm, making the cool space cooler and the warm space warmer. During the heating season, heat pumps move heat from the cool outdoors into your warm house; during the cooling season, heat pumps move heat from your cool house into the warm outdoors. Because they move heat rather than generate heat, heat pumps can provide up to 4 times the amount of energy they consume.

The most common type of heat pump is the air-source heat pump, which transfers heat between your house and the outside air. If you heat with electricity, a heat pump can trim the amount of electricity you use for heating by as much as 30%-40%. High-efficiency heat pumps also dehumidify better than standard central air conditioners, resulting in less energy usage and more cooling comfort in summer months. However, the efficiency of most air-source heat pumps as a heat source drops dramatically at low temperatures, generally making them unsuitable for cold climates, although there are systems that can overcome that problem.

For homes without ducts, air-source heat pumps are also available in a ductless version called a mini-split heat pump. In addition, a special type of air-source heat pump called a "reverse cycle chiller" generates hot and cold water rather than air, allowing it to be used with radiant floor heating systems in heating mode.

Higher efficiencies are achieved with geothermal (ground-source or water-source) heat pumps, which transfer heat between your house and the ground or a nearby water source. Although they cost more to install, geothermal heat pumps have low operating costs because they take advantage of relatively constant ground or water temperatures. However, the installation depends on the size of your lot, the subsoil and landscape. Ground-source or water-source heat pumps can be used in more extreme climatic conditions than air-source heat pumps, and customer satisfaction with the systems is very high.

A new type of heat pump for residential systems is the absorption heat pump, also called a gas-fired heat pump. Absorption heat pumps use heat as their energy source, and can be driven with a wide variety of heat sources.

HOW THEY WORK

A heat pump's refrigeration system consists of a compressor and two coils made of copper tubing (one indoors and one outside), which are surrounded by aluminum fins to aid heat transfer. In the heating mode, liquid refrigerant in the outside coils extracts heat from the air and evaporates into a gas. The indoor coils release heat from the refrigerant as it condenses back into a liquid. A reversing valve, near the compressor, can change the direction of the refrigerant flow for cooling as well as for defrosting the outdoor coils in winter.

When outdoor temperatures fall below 40°F, a less-efficient panel of electric resistance coils, similar to those in your toaster, kicks in to provide indoor heating. This is why air-source heat pumps aren't always very efficient for heating in areas with cold winters. Some units now have gas-fired backup furnaces instead of electric resistance coils, allowing them to operate more efficiently

The efficiency and performance of today's air-source heat pumps is one-and-a-half to two times greater than those available 30 years ago. This improvement in efficiency has resulted from technical advances and options such as these:

In heating mode, an air-source heat pump evaporates a refrigerant in the outdoor coil; as the liquid evaporates it pulls heat from the outside air. After the gas is compressed, it passes into the indoor coil and condenses, releasing heat to the inside of the house. The pressure changes caused by the compressor and the expansion valve allow the gas to evaporate at a low temperature outside and condense at a higher temperature indoors.

  • Thermostatic expansion valves for more precise control of the refrigerant flow to the indoor coil
  • Variable speed blowers, which are more efficient and can compensate for some of the adverse effects of restricted ducts, dirty filters, and dirty coils
  • Improved coil design
  • Improved electric motor and two-speed compressor designs
  • Copper tubing, grooved inside to increase surface area.

Most central heat pumps are split-systems-that is, they each have one coil indoors and one outdoors. Supply and return ducts connect to a central fan, which is located indoors.

Some heat pumps are packaged systems. These usually have both coils and the fan outdoors. Heated or cooled air is delivered to the interior from ductwork that protrudes through a wall or roof.

OPERATING AND MAINTAINING YOUR HEAT PUMP

Proper operation of your heat pump will save energy. Do not set back the heat pump's thermostat if it causes the backup heating to come on; backup heating systems are usually more expensive to operate. Continuous indoor fan operation can degrade heat pump performance unless a high-efficiency, variable-speed fan motor is used. Operate the system on the "auto" fan setting on the thermostat.

Like all heating and cooling systems, proper maintenance is key to efficient operation. The difference between the energy consumption of a well-maintained heat pump and a severely neglected one ranges from 10%-25%.

Clean or change filters once a month or as needed, and maintain the system according to manufacturer's instructions. Dirty filters, coils, and fans reduce airflow through the system. Reduced airflow decreases system performance and can damage your system's compressor. Clean outdoor coils whenever they appear dirty; occasionally, turn off power to the fan and clean it; remove vegetation and clutter from around the outdoor unit. Clean the supply and return registers within your home, and straighten their fins if bent.

You should also have a professional technician service your heat pump at least every year. The technician can do the following:

  • Inspect ducts, filters, blower, and indoor coil for dirt and other obstructions
  • Diagnose and seal duct leakage
  • Verify adequate airflow by measurement
  • Verify correct refrigerant charge by measurement
  • Check for refrigerant leaks
  • Inspect electric terminals, and if necessary, clean and tighten connections, and apply nonconductive coating
  • Lubricate motors, and inspect belts for tightness and wear
  • Verify correct electric control, making sure that heating is locked out when the thermostat calls for cooling and vice versa
  • Verify correct thermostat operation.

ADVANCED FEATURES TO LOOK FOR IN A HEAT PUMP

A number of relatively new innovations are improving the performance of heat pumps.

Unlike standard compressors that can only operate at full capacity, two-speed compressors allow heat pumps to operate close to the heating or cooling capacity that is needed at any particular moment. This saves large amounts of electrical energy and reduces compressor wear. Two-speed heat pumps also work well with zone control systems. Zone control systems, often found in larger homes, use automatic dampers to allow the heat pump to keep different rooms at different temperatures.

Some models of heat pumps are equipped with variable-speed or dual-speed motors on their indoor fans (blowers), outdoor fans, or both. The variable-speed controls for these fans attempt to keep the air moving at a comfortable velocity, minimizing cool drafts and maximizing electrical savings. It also minimizes the noise from the blower running at full speed.

Many high-efficiency heat pumps are equipped with a desuperheater, which recovers waste heat from the heat pump's cooling mode and uses it to heat water. A desuperheater-equipped heat pump can heat water 2 to 3 times more efficiently than an ordinary electric water heater.

Another advance in heat pump technology is the scroll compressor, which consists of two spiral-shaped scrolls. One remains stationary, while the other orbits around it, compressing the refrigerant by forcing it into increasingly smaller areas. Compared to the typical piston compressors, scroll compressors have a longer operating life and are quieter. According to some reports, heat pumps with scroll compressors provide 10°-15°F (5.6°-8.3°C) warmer air when in the heating mode, compared to existing heat pumps with piston compressors.

Although most heat pumps use electric resistance heaters as a backup for cold weather, heat pumps can also be equipped with burners to supplement the heat pump. Back-up burners help solve the problem of the heat pump delivering relatively cool air during cold weather and reduces its use of electricity. Since there are few heat pump manufacturers that incorporate both types of heat supply in one box, these configurations are often two smaller, side-by-side, standard systems sharing the same ductwork. The combustion fuel half of the system could be propane, natural gas, oil, or even coal and wood.

In comparison with a combustion fuel-fired furnace or standard heat pump alone, this type of system is also economical. Actual energy savings depend on the relative costs of the combustion fuel relative to electricity.

For more information on Heat Pumps, visit our Heat Pump sub-pages: 

  • Blossburg
  • Canton
  • Dushore
  • Eagle Mere
  • Hughsville
  • Jersey Shore
  • Laporte
  • Mansfield
  • Montgomery
  • Montoursville
  • Muncy
  • Muncy Valley
  • Sayre
  • Tioga
  • Towanda
  • Trout Run
  • Troy
  • Wellsboro
  • Williamsport

Testimonials

  • Theodore, Williamsport

    I appreciate the fact that Solaire Home Comfort's owners, employees, and technicians are courteous, respectful, proficient, and professional about the way they do business. I will definitely recommend Solaire Home Comfort to others and call them next time I have a heating or cooling issue.

  • Jim, Williamsport

    I have used your company for 10 years. I always considered your work good and the cost fair. My geothermal system works great, and I have recommended your firm to several interested parties.

  • Ken, Montoursville

    I have been a customer for over 20 years and don't remember of ever having a complaint about service. They have been able to take care of my needs within a reasonable period of time. I feel like I know and am friends with quite few people that are in their organization.

  • Marvel, Ralston

    Solaire Home Comfort staff is personal and friendly. When our boiler was installed, there was no problem with me assisting the installer with running the required plumbing throughout the house.

  • Donna, Columbia Crossroads

    The Solaire Home Comfort staff is always professional and courteous. The technicians appear to be competent and knowledgeable. They have always been prompt in responding to our needs. I would definitely recommend Solaire Home Comfort to others.

  • Donald and Arlene, Williamsport

    Late last summer we decided to purchase a heating/cooling system and heard about Solaire Home Comfort through a contractor, who had one of your systems installed in his own home.

  • Bill, Fanklin Township, Bradford County, PA

    When I needed emergency help, Solaire had a quick response. Always courteous and pleasant and dependable. Recommend highly! I've told others.

  • James, Jersey Shore

    Solaire Home Comfort has always resolved any problem that I've had. Your tech is very thorough. He kept me informed thorough the whole process. I'm happy with your company.

  • Richard, Troy

    I think you do a good job and have never had any problems with you. Your tech is very good.

  • Nancy, Cogan Station

    You've been a good company all these years. Very reliable. Great service. Your tech did a great job. He showed respect. I enjoyed him being here.

  • Jerry, Williamsport

    I've had very prompt and satisfactory service [from Solaire Home Comfort].